Youth protection

With regard to support for children, the Youth Protection Act applies only when a child’s safety or development is or might be jeopardized. The measures of this Act are applied only as a last resort.

To resolve problems before the situation deteriorates to this point, families can obtain services adapted to the culture and context of their community. These services are called first-line preventive social services.

Portrait of youth protection in the Quebec First Nations

Depending on the degree to which services have been taken over by the communities, there are different types of agreements between Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), the band councils and the youth centres setting out their respective roles and responsibilities.

In Quebec:

  • 15 Aboriginal child and family support organizations providing services to 19 First Nations communities, with funding from AANDC;
  • 3 youth centres coming under the responsibility of the provincial government to serve the 8 remaining communities. 

List of agreement types by community[MS1] 

Community[MS2] 

Type of agreement

Akwesasne

Bipartite

Betsiamites

Bipartite

Abitibi-Témiscamingue YC (youth centre) Timiskaming / Kipawa / Long Point

Tripartite

Abitibi-Témiscamingue YC Winneway / Kitcisakik / Lac Simon

Bipartite (YC -AANDC)

Laurentides YC Kanesatake

Tripartite

Outaouais YC Barrière Lake

Bipartite (YC -AANDC)

Atikamekw Nation Council Manawan / Wemotaci

Bipartite

Essipit

Bipartite

Gesgapegiag

Bipartite

Waban Aki  Grand Council Wôlinak / Odanak

Bipartite

Kahnawake

Bipartite

Kitigan Zibi

Bipartite

Listuguj

Bipartite

Mamit Innuat Pakua Shipi / Unamen Shipu / Ekuanitshit

Bipartite

Mashteuiatsh

Bipartite

Matimekosh / Lac-John

Bipartite

Natashquan

Bipartite

Opitciwan

Bipartite

Uashat mak Mani-Utenam

Bipartite

Wendake

Bipartite

Role of the FNQLHSSC

The First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission (FNLQHSSC) has the responsibility to advise and support the communities in the development, implementation and follow-up activities involved in taking over their youth protection services. It also contributes to the development of social services workers’ skills related to its field of expertise.

Information

To learn more about the Youth Protection Act, see Our children’s security is our responsibility, published by the FNQLHSSC. Guidelines for Establishing a Special Youth Protection Program for Native Peoples

You can also consult Guidelines for Establishing a Special Youth Protection Program for Native Peoples, a document of the Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux. Please contact our office to obtain this document in English.

    

The FNQLHSSC's mandate is to support the staff working in the First Nations communities and organizations.

For any specific support for clients (parents, grandparents, foster families, etc.), we encourage you to communicate directly with the first-line services in your community or, where appropriate, with the youth protection services.