BULLETIN D'INFORMATION DE LA CSSSPNQL




  • The FNQLHSSC’s visual branding gets a makeover
déc. 14, 2015

During the 2015 Annual General Assembly, the members chose a new version of our logo among the options that were presented to them.

 

The original visual had been created by an artist from the community of Mashteuiatsh,
Marie-Ève Dubé Courtois. It was necessary to rework the logo since it is used on various promotional materials, in social media and on all documents published by the FNQLHSSC. However, the defining features of the former visual were kept, namely, the colours, the sphere, the goose and the suns. The goose, over the course of its long journeys through Quebec and Labrador, symbolizes the mission of the FNQLHSSC.

 

The four feathers represent the four key elements of the FNQLHSSC’s mission:

1.           Physical wellness

2.           Mental wellness

3.           Emotional wellness

4.           Spiritual wellness

 

The eleven suns represent the eleven contemporary nations of Quebec and Labrador, namely, the Inuit and the ten nations:

•            Abenaki

•            Algonquin

•            Atikamekw

•            Cree

•            Huron-Wendat

•            Innu

•            Inuit

•            Malecite

•            Mi'gmaq

•            Mohawk

•            Naskapi

 

The goose, gazing into the future (First Nations governance), guides the communities towards self-determination.

 

For the choice of font, the “stick” type typeface was chosen because it is easy to read, classic, as well as aesthetic. In terms of alignment, the text is centred with the goose to demonstrate the stability and professionalism of the FNQLHSSC, thus striking a balance between the image and the text. Keeping the three original colours was considered indispensable.

 

The new visual comes at the same time as significant changes are being made in the clarification of our service offer, strategic plan and communications plan. All of these documents will form a strong, coherent whole for our collaborators and funders, but more importantly, for our communities.