National conference releasing the results of the First Nations Regional Early Childhood, Education and Employment Survey (FNREEES): the FNQLHSSC presents the results for Quebec

Par Chantal Cleary | déc. 14, 2015

National conference releasing the results of the First Nations Regional Early Childhood, Education and Employment Survey (FNREEES): the FNQLHSSC presents the results for Quebec

 

 

The FNREEES National Data Release Conference, organized by the First Nations Information Governance Centre (FNIGC), took place on November 17 to 19, 2015, in Ottawa. First Nations experts, leaders and planners, academics, government representatives and stakeholders attended three days of workshops, group discussions and skill-building sessions under the theme, “Now is the time: Our data, our stories, our future.” 

 

Every day, speakers, plenary sessions, presentations and workshops addressed First Nations early childhood development, education and employment—the three topics at the core of the FNREEES. Jonathan Leclerc, Population Surveys Coordinator at the FNQLHSSC, was invited to present the preliminary survey findings for the region of Quebec.

 

Here is a snapshot of the data collection phase in the region of Quebec:

 

  • 20 participating communities from 8 nations
  • 2 436 respondents
  • 73 interviewers (recruited and trained)
  • 84 days of training in each community included in the sample
  • More than 500 000 questions asked
  • 16 months of data collection
  • 3 449 variables to analyze
  • More than 25 000 km of distance travelled

 

Survey results

 

In the first few weeks of 2016, the FNQLHSSC’s Population Surveys’ team will send aggregated data to participating communities in the form of frequency tables and will begin analyzing the survey results before drafting the regional report.

 

Launched in 2013, the FNREEES is a one-of-a-kind survey that will provide a portrait of early childhood development, education and employment in First Nations communities and help fill the data gap that exists in these critical areas. In Canada, the survey was conducted in nearly 250 First Nations communities in ten provinces and two territories between 2013 and 2015, with more than 22 000 First Nations adults, youths and children taking part.